General Chat

Just an empty post, I'll keep it listed on the side menu for continuing discussions so we can use it at a place for talking about anything you want.

25 comments:

Ian said...

So how bout that local sports team hey?

Will said...

Dams at 35%.

Ian said...

I found this list of animation related quotes just now, here are some of my favs.

"Talent without craft is like fuel without an engine, it burns wildly but accomplishes nothing."

"Tell me that the piece green fabric with eyes and a mouth that is Kermit, is not one of the finest examples of a simple looking character at its strongest, and I'll pig-slap ya in the style of his equally daunting 'lady-friend!' "

More here
http://www.andrewsilke.com/quotes.html

clay said...

www.flyingbark.com.au

(hint cheak the jobs sections)

MattG said...

I'm adding one of my favorite animation-related quotes:

"No matter how good everyone tells you your work is, you can always make it better."

animation_student said...

Animation quotes. Good idea. Here's one:

"Never rig a wishbone where your spline ought to be".

(After Clementine Paddleford, "never grow a wishbone where your backbone ought to be")

Sam said...

"You can't create the illusion of life if you haven't lived one"

- Brad Bird

clay said...

Brisbane guy: Ryan Daniel won 11 second club... the critic is now up... anyone know this guy?

just loading up the critic now.

animator said...

Krome Studios? Does Kristi know?

frank said...

Well spotted Clay. I just posted a few questions on the 11SecondClub forum to see if Ryan replies.

Seems he has 6 years experience.

I'll get a Critique blog post up tomorrow (if Ian hasn't done it already)and hopefully some more info about Ryan, if he replies.

Ian said...

Are we going to do a post about every new critique? There is one evry month.

Ian said...

Not sure if this is word for word but I once herd Frank Oz say something along the lines of, Your craft is like a rocking chair, you lean back on it and it suports you while you create your art.

Anonymous said...

while sitting on your butt

-clay

Sam said...

According to LinkedIn that guy's a senior animator at THQ.

frank said...

I see what you mean Ian. That critique didn't move me to make it a post. But if I find out more stuff about Ryan Daniel (as local talent), a blog post may still come of this.

Burger from Melbourne said...

Ed Hook's, in regards to observation, said: Animators are allowed to stare.

Ian said...

Thats a nice one, I wonder if we could get the general public to understand.

"What the hell are you looking at bub?!?!?!"

"Oh I'm sorry, I'm an animator."

"oh, fair enough" :)

Ian said...

I herd a rumour from a little first year birdy who has a friend studying at QCA.

Aparently they have ditched all of the drawing subjects from their course. Making us (Southbank) one of the last courses to still cover traditional animation techniques. I think its just us and QUT now, and we do it a lot more than QUT.

I think these folk are nuts, theres no better way to learn the crafdt than by drawing.

Ian said...

Clay has asked about how much trafic drops by this blog. Over the past month we have averaged about 80 hits a day and 50ish are unigue visitors (if one person comes back twice in a day from the same PC thats 2 hits but only one unique visitor).

I think we have reached beyond our students, I don't think there would be that many comming back every day. Also I think we get some trafic from highend3D because I put the easymanV2 rig up there and there is a link here in the description. Franks posts are popular too, I think people like that he stirs up debate.

Getting a big readership isn't a huge deal for me, as often as not this place is just personal therapy :P. But I must admit its nice to know people are reading and watching.

If you're wondering what it takes to get serious trafic to a blog then one way I know of is to get noticed and linked to by one of the big blogs, like Cartoon Brew, Drawn or Cold Hard Flash.
Here is a post from the Syncrolux blog that shows what happened when he was singled out by Cartoon Brew. I think for that to happen there would need to be a greater percentage of original content, instead of the linking to other sites and films. I have mixed feelings about this, I hope this place serves as a good research tool as much as a place where you can just hear my opinions. Maybe if I have time to do some more video tutorials we might make some waves. :)

Clayton McIntosh said...

Thats pretty good eh'.

A similar thing happened for my old site where I was getting 20 visits a day (mostly friends) and then Zac Anderson made me a cake with white ninja on it and a photo got on the website linking to my site and it went to 1000 or more for a few days... then back to 20. tee hee. Theres a lesson in this for anyone wanting to advertise soemthing.

frank said...

I was drawing with my 4B forest destroying pencil, on the recycled paper the animation course has procured this year (even after having just learned how to load leads in a Pacer (I thought a Pacer was a model of Valiant car until the youngsters laughingly explained to 'animation grandad')).

Anyway, I noticed that the overhead life-sucking flouro lights reflect off the 4B marks on page made, as to render them invisble to the naked eye.

Well how about that?

Ian is always telling us to turn off the light in the light box when we're working loose (and with naked eyes). But it's hard to do so when the lines disappear. The way to fix it is to back light the page and the shiny line goes black. Voila!

It is important to be observant to be a competent animator.

Lisa said...

frank - don't forget to look at your drawing back to front on the lightbox, or hold it up to the mirror as well - another oldie but a goldie trick ...forces you to look at your drawing in a whole new way. Kind of like animating something one day - then coming back to it the next day after a break - you often notice more things if you go away from it.

Ian said...

Golden wisdom from Lisa as always.

I'm much happier with you drawing with a 4B than a pacer any day frank, so don't stress about that one.

I still think its best to do most of your key frame with the back light off. May be just flick it on to make sure yout feet are in the same place, or to check your arcs. Switching the light off so you can't see the previous keys forces you to start again from nothing, your pose is less likely to be a mear evolution of the previous.

The light must have been hitting the pencil mark at a specific angle to reflect off it so. Did it occour to you that you could have moved over a few desks. We have many more than we actually need at the moment so I'm sure there would have been some spare.

The lights in the ceiling have off switches too. You could have set it so that only half the lights in the room were on.

I've probably given this little musing far more attention than it deserved. I'll shut up now :)

Lisa said...

4B? Bah! 6B, now you're talking pencils! :-) Just teasing...there's no way i'd want to see someone doing their rough animation with a really fine pacer. Get in there with a solid pencil, keep it rough, don't fuss over it too much and think about - the movement, the arcs, the strong keys and the flow. You'd go through a couple of boxes of leads for a pacer in one sitting using that to do rough animation.

frank said...

Nice practical deytailed advice. Thanks Lisa.

The snagglefrassun*#@! lead keeps breaking when I sharpen my 4Bs and the pencils disappear too quick. I have converted to sharpening with a knife and whittling rather than pencil sharpening.

This may just be a dud pack of Staedlers that the night fill zombie dropped on the ground.